Sunday, January 19, 2014

Sole survivor

They sent a boat
to collect the parting debris of me
among the floating pieces
of broken sureness. 


I learned it from Icarus,
the importance of knowing
how close from the sun
is too close

how one can survive the fall
by breathing slowly
and avoiding questions
on the nature of living,

on the nature of dying.

19 comments:

  1. It is a good philosophical question!Great piece!

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  2. Yes, yes. Learn it better than Icarus, why don't we?

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  3. I. Love. This! I think this is my first time reading your work, but I'll be back.
    (love your profile description by the way)

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  4. The full sun - burning as it does.
    Will never be too close.

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  5. Love the opening stanza, great write.

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  6. First stanza - surprize! Philosophical question....

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  7. What a lesson. Being so sure and then falling down. At the same time, prepared for the fall and being picked up. Sad that it ends in possible avoidance, some things we just are not ready to know!

    Thanks for sharing! :) I enjoyed.

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  8. So brilliantly done, Kenia. You have taken a familiar analogy and made it all your own. So unique to take from the viewpoint of one who survives the fall, albeit a little bent, a little broken.

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  9. A floating feather of allegory, light and no matter how far it falls, landing intact.Lovely, Kenia.

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  10. I do like the tender wisdom in this - very nicely achieved Kenia... With Best Wishes Scott www.scotthastie.com

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  11. Such a beautiful piece.I love the opening

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  12. I can't improve on Hedgewitch's comment, so I won't try. This just kept turning in the air.

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  13. Fabulous opening lines. Terrific

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  14. how close from the sun
    is too close

    One often takes risks in life and are not really cautioned of the impending consequences These are simple mistakes that can be avoided. Nicely Kenia!

    Hank

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  15. We each, at various times in our lives, become mere flotsam and jetsam. And then the tides change and we manage to reassemble ourselves... or not.

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  16. This is a gem of a poem--tightly constructed, with no waste or unnecessary side-trips, and wonderfully visual. Fine, fine work.

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  17. The tenuous condition of 'the nature of living' is captured with great delicacy and strength here.

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